Skiing the Pacific Ring of Fire and Beyond
        Amar Andalkar's Ski Mountaineering and Climbing Site
Ski Mountaineering Photos & Trip Reports Equipment & Info Cascade Volcanoes Ring of Fire Site Map

North America | South America | Asia | Oceania & Antarctica | Beyond the Ring | Volcanic Seven Summits | Volcano WebCams
ALASKA &
NW CANADA MAP



WESTERN U.S.
& CANADA MAP

  Rainbow Range
  Ilgachuz Range
  Itcha Range
  Silverthrone Mountain
  Mount Waddington
  Mount Munday
  Yellowstone Caldera
  Craters of the Moon
  Mammoth Mountain
  Mount Williamson
  Mount Whitney
  Humphreys Peak
  Mount Baldy
  Mount Taylor
  Valles Caldera


MEXICO &
C. AMERICA MAP





Western United States & Canada: Regional Map and Introduction

The content of this section was reorganized in early 2003. This section now covers the major skiable volcanoes of the western U.S. and Canada, except those in the Cascade Range. The Cascade volcanoes of California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia are already covered in a separate guidebook on this website, Skiing the Cascade Volcanoes, and the duplicate pages have now been removed from this section. The descriptive paragraphs below will be revised to reflect the updated content.





Select a mountain from the clickable map above


Southern British Columbia #
    Info about volcanoes of southern British Columbia (except Cascade volcanoes) . . .

Anahim Volcanic Belt:
    Rainbow Range
    Ilgachuz Range
    Itcha Range


Coast Mountains and Pemberton Volcanic Belt:
    Silverthrone Mountain
    Mount Waddington
    Mount Munday


Sierra Nevada #
    The Sierra Nevada stretches along the eastern edge of California, crowned by many spectacular peaks including the highest in the contiguous US, Mt Whitney. The main range is non-volcanic, formed from an uplifted fault block, but several active volcanic centers can be found along the eastern edge, such as the Inyo and Mono Craters and the Long Valley Caldera (Mammoth Mtn). The Sierra is also usually blessed with plentiful snowfall, but is more prone to severe winter drought than the Cascades. The weather in spring and summer is usually much sunnier than in the Cascades to the north, thus producing the famous Sierra spring corn snow.

Interior West #
    The dominant feature of the interior West is the Rocky Mountains, which stretch in a series of ranges from south of the Mexican border to far north in Canada, and include the majority of the high peaks in the lower 48 United States. The Rockies are folded and uplifted mountains, without any significant volcanic peaks, and so are beyond the scope of these pages (and well represented in many published guidebooks). The interior West does, however, contain numerous scattered volcanic centers. Best known are the Yellowstone caldera in Wyoming and the Craters of the Moon in Idaho, but other recent volcanic features can be found in Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. The only major stratovolcanoes in this region are San Francisco Mtn (the highest point is called Humphreys Peak) and Mt Taylor, both of which are long extinct. Generally, the climate in the interior is much drier than along the Pacific coast, with greater extremes of heat in summer and cold in winter. Snowfall is far less than in the Cascades or Sierra, but usually is plentiful enough, and much more likely to be powder.



North America | South America | Asia | Oceania & Antarctica | Beyond the Ring | Volcanic Seven Summits | Volcano WebCams
Ski Mountaineering Photos & Trip Reports Equipment & Info Cascade Volcanoes Ring of Fire Site Map

Amar Andalkar   Seattle, WA, USA   <About the Author / Contact Me>
All material on this website is ©1997-2017 by Amar Andalkar unless otherwise noted.
Page content last modified: Thursday, March 20, 2003
PHP script last modified: Monday, April 25, 2005